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Publications List

This list includes books, articles, chapters, and reports by researchers at the Center on School, Family, and Community Partnerships at Johns Hopkins University and National Network of Partnership Schools. The publications (mainly since 2000) can be obtained from most university libraries and from the publishers.

Some earlier studies are included as readings in the book School, Family and Community Partnerships: Preparing Educators and Improving Schools (Epstein, 2011).  A complete list of earlier studies on the nature and effects of family and community involvement conducted at Johns Hopkins since 1981 is available on request.

Publications in each section are arranged alphabetically by author and by date.  The authors are or were associated with the Center as researchers, staff, postdoctoral fellows, or visiting scholars.

Index

NNPS Books for Research, Policy, and Practice

  • Epstein, J. L. (2011). School, family, and community partnerships: Preparing educators and improving schools. 2nd edition.  Boulder, CO: Westview Press.
  • Epstein, J. L., Sanders, M. G., Sheldon, S. B., et al. (2009). School, family, and community partnerships: Your handbook for action. 3rd edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
  • Hutchins, D. J., Greenfeld, M. D., & Epstein, J. L. (2015). Family reading night. 2nd edition. New York: Taylor & Francis/Routledge.
  • Hutchins, D. J., Greenfeld, M. D., Epstein, J. L., Sanders, M. G., & Galindo, C.  (2012). Multicultural partnerships: Involve all families. New York: Taylor & Frances/Routledge.
  • Sanders, M. G. (2005). Building school-community partnerships: Collaboration for student success. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
  • Sanders, M. G., & Sheldon, S. B. (2009). Principals Matter: A guide to school, family, and community partnerships. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
  • Sheldon, S. B., & Turner-Vorbeck, T. (Eds.) (in press). Handbook on Family, School, Community Partnerships in Education. Wiley Press.

All publications (from 2000)

Partnership Program Development in Schools, Districts, Communities, and Colleges: Studies, Reviews, and Perspectives
Results for Students of Family and Community Involvement
Teachers Involve Parents in Schoolwork (TIPS) and Surveys (in separate sections of the website)

 

Studies, Reviews, and Perspectives

Partnership Program Development in Schools, Districts, Communities, and Colleges


Elementary Schools

  • Epstein, J. L.  (2016). Framework of six types of involvement. Pp. 610-613 in SAGE encyclopedia of contemporary early childhood education, edited by Donna L. Couchenour and Kent Chrisman.  Thousand Oaks. CA: Sage Publishing (Reference).
  • Lewis, K. C. (2004). Instructional aides: Colleagues or cultural brokers? The School Community Journal, 14(1), 91-111.
  • Sanders, M. G. (2008). How parent liaisons can help bridge home and school. Journal of Educational Research, 101, 287-297.
  • Sanders, M. G., & Harvey, A. (2002). Beyond the school walls: A case study of principal leadership for school-community collaboration. Teachers College Record, 104(7), 1345-1368.
  • Sheldon, S. B. (2005). Testing a structural equations model of partnership program implementation and parent involvement. The Elementary School Journal, 106(2), 171-187.
  • Sheldon, S. B. (2002). Parents’ social networks and beliefs as predictors of parent involvement. Elementary School Journal, 102(4), 301-316.

Middle and High Schools

  • Catsambis, S. (2001). Expanding knowledge of parental involvement in children’s secondary education: Connections with high school seniors’ academic success. Social Psychology of Education, 5, 149-177.
  • Catsambis, S., & Beveridge, A. A. (2001). Does neighborhood matter? Family, neighborhood, and school influences on eighth-grade mathematics achievement. Sociological Focus, 34(4), 435-457.
  • Epstein, J. L. (2007). Connections count: Improving family and community involvement in secondary schools. Principal Leadership (NASSP), 8(2), 16-22.
  • Epstein, J. L. (2007). Family and community involvement. In K. Borman, S. Cahill, & B. Cotner (Eds.), Praeger handbook of American high schools, (pp. 165-173). Westport, CT: Greenwood Publishing Group.
  • Epstein, J. L. (2007). Homework. In K. Borman, S. Cahill, & B. Cotner (Eds.), Praeger handbook of American high schools, (pp. 224-228). Westport, CT: Greenwood Publishing Group.
  • Epstein, J. L. (2004). Meeting NCLB requirements for family involvement. Middle Ground, 8(1), 14-17.
  • Epstein, J. L., & Hutchins, D. J. (2011). Family involvement. In C. Weiland (Ed.), This we believe in action: Implementing successful middle level schools(pp. 181-198). Westerville OH: Association for Middle Level Education.
  • Hutchins, D. J. (2013). Improving home-school collaboration in middle grades. AMLE Magazine.
  • Hutchins, D. J. (2011). Parent involvement in middle school: Cultivating comprehensive and inclusive programs of partnership. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Maryland, College Park, College Park, MD. (UMI No.3461532)
  • Sanders, M. G. (2011). Family engagement in high school.  In S. Redding, M. Murphy, & P. Sheley. Handbook on family and community engagement(pp. 141-146). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
  • Sanders, M. G. (2006). Missteps in team leadership: The experiences of six novice teachers in three urban schools. Urban Education, 41(3), 277-304.
  • Sanders, M. G. (2001). Schools, families, and communities partnering for middle level students’ success. NASSP Bulletin, 85(627), 53-61.
  • Sanders, M. G., & Epstein, J. L. (2000). Building school-family-community partnerships in middle and high schools. In M. G. Sanders, (Ed.), Schooling students placed at risk: Research, policy and practice in the education of poor and minority adolescents (pp. 339-361). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  • Sanders, M. G., & Herting, J. R. (2000). Gender and the effects of school, family and church support on the academic achievement of African-American urban adolescents. In M. G. Sanders (Ed.), Schooling students placed at risk: Research, policy and practice in the education of poor and minority adolescents (pp. 141-161). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  • Sanders, M. G., & Lewis, K. C. (2005). Building bridges toward excellence: Community involvement in high schools. The High School Journal 88(3), 1-9.
  • Sanders, M. G., & Lewis, K. C. (2004). Partnerships at an urban high school: Meeting the parent involvement requirements of No Child Left Behind. E-Journal of Teaching and Learning in Diverse Settings 2(1), 78-98.
  • Simon, B. S. (2004). High school outreach and family involvement. Social Psychology of Education, 7, 185-209.
  • Van Voorhis, F. L. (2003). Interactive homework in middle school: Effects on family involvement and students’ science achievement. Journal of Educational Research, 96(9), 323-339.
  • Van Voorhis, F. L. (2001). Interactive science homework: An experiment in home and school connections. NASSP Bulletin, 85(627), 20-32.

Across Grade, School, and Policy Levels

  • Ames, R. T., & Sheldon, S. B. (2017). Annual NNPS report: 2016 school data.  Baltimore, MD: National Network of Partnership Schools at Johns Hopkins University. (Also see prior annual reports at www.partnershipschools.org in Research and Evaluation.)
  • Epstein, J. L. (2016).  Creating a national network on school, family, and community partnerships: Multi-level goals, challenges, and successes.  Pp. 30-38 in Proceedings:  ESCXEL project international conference: Networks, communities and partnerships in education. Edited by E. Gonsalves & S. Batista. Lisbon, Portugal: New University of Lisbon.
  • Epstein, J. L. (2016). Family and community involvement.  Pp. 311-319 in R. S. Gereige and E. A. Zenni (eds.) School health: Policy & practice, 7th edition.  Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics.
  • Epstein, J. L. (2016).  Searching for equity in education: Finding school, family, and community partnerships.  Pp. 69-86 in A. R. Sadovnik (ed.), Leaders in the sociology of education: Intellectual self-portraits.  Rotterdam and Boston: Sense Publishers.
  • Epstein, J. L. (2014).  Six principles for research-based partnership programs.  Better:Evidence-Based Education, 6, 4-5.
  • Epstein, J. L. (2013). Programas efectivos de involucrameiento familiar en las escuelas: Estudios y prácticas.  Santiago, Chile: Fundación CAP.  (Chapters and articles translated in Spanish).
  • Epstein, J. L. (2010). Caring connections: Linking research and practice to improve programs of family and community involvement.  Phi Delta Kappan (November), p. 65. (Introduction to online special issue on “classic” articles).
  • Epstein, J. L. (2007). Introductory interview: Helping family-school-community partnership thrive. Democracy and Education, 16(4), 2-5.
  • Epstein, J. L. (2005). Attainable goals? The spirit and letter of the No Child Left Behind Act on parental involvement. Sociology of Education, 78, 179-182.
  • Epstein. J. L. (2005). Foreword. In E. N. Patrikakou, R. P. Weisberg, S. Redding, & H. Walberg (Eds.), School-family partnerships: Fostering children’s school success (pp. vii-xi). New York: Teachers College Press.
  • Epstein, J. L. (2004). Family Involvement and technology: Always about equity. Access Learning, 14(5), 3.
  • Epstein, J. L. (2004). Have we gone overboard on homework? Johns Hopkins Magazine, 56(2), 4-5.
  • Epstein, J. L. (2002). Family, school, and community connections. In J. W. Guthrie (Ed.), Encyclopedia of education: Vol. 3 (2nd ed., pp. 821-828). New York: Macmillan.
  • Epstein, J. L. (2001). Building bridges of home, school, and community: The importance of design. Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk (JESPAR), 6, 161-167.
  • Epstein, J. L., & Hine, M. G.  (2017). Annual NNPS report: 2016 school data.  Baltimore, MD:  National Network of Partnership Schools at Johns Hopkins University. (Also, see prior annual reports at www.partnershipschools.org in Research and Evaluation.)
  • Epstein, J. L., & Hutchins, D. J. (2013).   Compendium of promising leadership practices. (Part 2.  Final report for New Leaders of best leadership practices from the Effective Practice Incentive Community- EPIC project).  New York: New Leaders.
  • Epstein, J. L., & Jansorn, N. R. (2004). Developing successful partnership programs: Principal leadership makes a difference. Principal, 83(3), 10-15.
  • Epstein, J. L., Jung, S. B., & Sheldon, S. B. (in press).  Toward equity in school, family, and community partnerships: The role of networks and the process of scale up. In S. B. Sheldon & T. Turner-Vorbeck, (Eds.) Handbook on family, school, and community partnerships in education. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell Press.
  • Epstein, J. L., & Salinas, K. C. (2004). Partnering with families and communities. Educational Leadership, 61(8), 12-18.
  • Epstein, J. L., & Sanders, M. G. (2002). Family, school, and community partnerships. In D. L. Levinson, P. W. Cookson, Jr., & A. R. Sadovnik (Eds.), Education and sociology: An encyclopedia (pp. 525-532). New York: Routledge Falmer.
  • Epstein, J. L., & Sanders, M. G. (2002). Family, school, and community partnerships. In M. Bornstein (Ed.), Handbook of parenting (2nd ed., pp. 407-437). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Epstein, J. L., & Sanders, M. G. (2000). Connecting home, school, and community: New directions for social research. In M. Hallinan (Ed.), Handbook of sociology of education (pp. 285-306). New York: Plenum.
  • Epstein, J. L., & Sheldon, S. B.  (2009).  Evaluation goals, tools, and approaches.  In J. Epstein, et al.  School, family, and community partnerships: Your handbook for action, 3rd edition (pp. 307-341).  Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
  • Epstein, J. L., & Sheldon, S. B. (2006). Moving forward: Ideas for research on school, family, and community partnerships.  In C. F. Conrad & R. Serlin (Eds.) SAGE handbook for research in education: Engaging ideas and enriching inquiry (pp. 117-137). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
  • Epstein, J. L., & Van Voorhis, F. L. (2010). School counselors’ roles in developing partnerships with families and communities for student success. Professional School Counseling, 16, 1-14.
  • Gerne, K. M., & Epstein, J. L. (2004). The power of partnerships: School, family, and community collaboration to improve children’s health. RMC Health Educator, 4(2), 1-6.
  • Greenfeld, M. D., & Epstein, J. L. (2010, 2013, and 2016).  Samplers: Goal-linked promising partnership practices.  (NOTE: Each Sampler summarizes research and provides examples of practices of family engagement in reading, math, science, writing, art, behavior, attendance, college and career planning, health, homework, transitions, tests and assessments, involving fathers, involving grandparents, summer learning, preschool programs, middle school programs, high school programs.)  Baltimore: Center on School, Family, and Community Partnerships.  Available in print form at www.partnershipschools.org in the section Success Stories.
  • Hidalgo, N., Siu, S-F., & Epstein, J. L. (2003). Research on families, schools, and communities: A multicultural perspective. In J. Banks (Ed.), Handbook of research on multicultural education. (2nd ed., pp. 631-655). New York: Macmillan.
  • Hutchins, D. J. (2012). Families and schools. Encyclopedia of diversity in education.
    J. A. Banks (Ed.). SAGE Publications, Inc.: Los Angeles, CA.
  • Kreider, H., & Sheldon, S. B.  (2010). Theoretical perspectives on family involvement.  In D. Hiatt-Michaels (Ed.), Promising practices in family involvement.  Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
  • Salinas, K. C. (2004). The tech connection: Seven ways to use technology to involve families in children’s education. Access Learning, 14(5), 8-9.
  • Sanders, M. G. (2007). Transcending boundaries. Principal Leadership, 8(2), 38-42.
  • Sanders, M. G. (2000). Creating successful school-based partnership programs with families of special needs students. The School-Community Journal, 10(2), 37-55.
  • Sanders, M. G., & Epstein, J. L. (2000). The National Network of Partnership Schools: How research influences educational practice. Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk, 5(1&2), 61-76.
  • Sanders, M. G., Sheldon, S. B., & Epstein, J. L. (2005). Improving schools’ partnership programs in the National Network of Partnership Schools. Journal of Educational Research and Policy Studies, 5(1), 24-47.
  • Sanders, M. G., & Simon, B. S. (2002). A comparison of program development at elementary, middle, and high schools in the National Network of Partnership Schools. The School Community Journal, 12(1), 7-27.
  • Sheldon, S. B. (2011). Framework for Partnerships.  In S. Redding, M. Murphy, & P. Sheley (Eds.), Handbook on family and community engagement (pp. 99-104). Charlotte, NC:  Information Age Publishing.
  • Sheldon, S. B. (2008). Getting families involved with NCLB: Factors affecting schools’ enactment of federal policy. In A. R. Sadovnik, J. O’ Day, G. Bohrnstedt, & K. Borman (Eds.), No Child Left Behind and the reduction of the achievement gap: Sociological perspectives on federal educational policy, (pp. 281-294). New York: Routledge.
  • Sheldon, S. B. (2002). Parental involvement in education. In James W. Guthrie (Ed.), Encyclopedia of education: Vol. 5 (2nd ed., pp. 1844-1847). New York: Macmillan.
  • Sheldon, S. B., & Epstein, J. L. (2005). School programs of family and community involvement to support children’s reading and literacy development across the grades. in J. Flood & P. Anders (Eds.) Literacy development of students in urban schools: Research and policy (pp. 107-138). Newark, DE: International Reading Association.
  • Sheldon, S. B., & Van Voorhis, F. L. (2004). Partnership programs in U.S. schools: Their development and relationship to family involvement outcomes.School Effectiveness and School Improvement 15(2), 125-148.
  • Simon, B. S., & Epstein, J. L. (2001). School, family, and community partnerships: Linking theory to practice. In D. Hiatt-Michaels (Ed.), Promising practices for family involvement in schools (pp. 1-24). Greenwich, CT: Information Age Publishing.
  • Thomas, B. G., Greenfeld, M. D., Ames, R. T., & Epstein, J. L. (2016).  Promising partnership practices 2016.  Baltimore:  Center on School, Family, and Community Partnerships and National Network of Partnership Schools.  (See annual books at www.partnershipschools.org in the section Success Stories.)
  • Van Voorhis, F. L. (2004). Reflecting on the homework ritual: Assignments and designs. Theory Into Practice, 43, 205-212.
  • Van Voorhis, F. L., & Sheldon, S. B. (2004). Principals’ roles in the development of U.S. programs of school, family, and community partnerships.International Journal of Educational Research, 41, 55-70.

Districts

  • Epstein, J. L. (2016) Commentary:  School, family, and community partnerships.  Learning Landscape (Linking Education and Community: Present and Future Possibilities), 10, 25-36.
  • Epstein, J. L. (2008). Research meets policy and practice: How are school districts addressing NCLB requirements for parental involvement? In A. R. Sadovnik, J. O’ Day, G. Bohrnstedt, & K. Borman (Eds.), No Child Left Behind and the reduction of the achievement gap: Sociological perspectives on federal educational policy (pp. 267-279). New York: Routledge.
  • Epstein, J. L., Galindo, C., & Sheldon, S. B. (2011). Levels of leadership: Effects of district and school leaders on the quality of school programs of family and community involvement.  Educational Administration Quarterly, 47, 462-495.
  • Epstein, J. L., & Sheldon, S. B. (2016).  Necessary but not sufficient: The role of policy for advancing programs of school, family, and community partnerships.  Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences, 2(5), 202–219.
  • Sanders, M. G. (2012). Achieving scale at the district level: A longitudinal multiple case study of a partnership reform. Educational Administration Quarterly, 48, 154-86.
  • Sanders, M. G. (2012).  Sustaining programs of school, family, and community partnerships: A qualitative longitudinal study of two districts. Educational Policy, 26,845869
  • Sanders, M. G. (2010). Parents as leaders: School, family, and community partnerships in two districts. In D. Houston, A. Blankstein, & R. Cole (Eds.),Leadership for family and community involvement. (pp.13-32). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
  • Sanders, M. G. (2009). Collaborating for change: How an urban school district and a community-based organization support and sustain school, family, and community partnerships. Teachers College Record, 111, 1693-1712.
  • Sanders, M. G. (2009). District leadership and school-community collaboration. In A.  Honigsfeld & A. Cohan (Eds.), Breaking the mold of school instruction and organization: Innovative and successful practices for the 21st century (pp. 139-147). Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.
  • Sanders, M. G. (2008). Using diverse data to develop and sustain school, family, and community partnerships: A district case study. Education Management, Administration, and Leadership, 36, 530-545.
  • Sanders, M. G. (2008). Supporting family engagement through district-level partnerships. Harvard Evaluation Exchange, 14 (1&2), 11 & 38.
  • Sheldon, S. B.  (2015). Moving beyond monitoring: A district leadership approach to school, family, and community partnerships. In Mooriman, Elizabeth & Sheridan, Susan (Ed.), Research on family-school partnerships: An interdisciplinary examination of state of the science and critical needs (Volume iii: Family-school partnerships in context).

Community-School Partnerships

  • DeTablan, D., & Sanders, M. G. (2017) Community outreach. In Peppler, K (Ed.), Encyclopedia for out-of-school learning (p. 105). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781483385198.n47
  • Galindo, C., & Sanders, M. G. (in press). Achieving equity in education through full-service community schools. In S. B. Sheldon & T. Turner-Vorbeck, (Eds.) Handbook on family, school, and community partnerships in education. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell Press.
  • Galindo, C., Sanders, M. G., & Abel, Y. (2017). Transforming educational experiences in low income communities: A qualitative case study of social capital in a full-service community school. American Educational Research Journal, Centennial Edition, 54(1S): 140-163.
  • Sanders, M. G. (in press). Crossing boundaries: A qualitative exploration of relational leadership in three full-service community schools. Teachers College Record.
  • Sanders, M. G. (2017). Community-school partnerships. In Peppler, K (Ed.), Encyclopedia for Out-of-School Learning. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications (pp. 112-114)DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781483385198.n50.
  • Sanders, M. G. (2015). Leadership, partnerships, and organizational development: Exploring components of effectiveness in three full-service community schools. School Effectiveness and School Improvement, 1-21.
  • Sanders, M. G. (2014). Principal leadership for school, family, and community partnerships: The role of a systems approach to reform implementation. American Journal of Education,120(2), 233-255.
  • Sanders, M. G. (2013). Poverty, families, and schools. In C. C. Yeakey, V. Thompson, &  A. Wells (Eds.). Urban ills: Confronting twenty-first century dilemmas of urban living in global contexts.  Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.
  • Sanders, M. G.  (2012). African American families and education. In J. Banks (Ed.), Encyclopedia of diversity in education. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
  • Sanders, M. G.  (2012). Community-school partnerships. In J. Banks (Ed.), Encyclopedia of diversity in education. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
  • Sanders, M. G.  (2011). Community involvement in middle schools: Partnering for young adolescents’ success. In C. Weiland (Ed.). This We Believe in Action: Implementing Successful Middle Schools.  Westerville, OH: National Middle School Association.
  • Sanders, M. G. (2008). How parent liaisons can help bridge home and school. Journal of Educational Research, 101, 287-297.
  • Sanders, M. G. (2003). Community involvement in schools: From concept to practice. Education and Urban Society, 35(2), 161-181.
  • Sanders, M. G. (2001). Partnerships of schools and faith-based organizations. In E. J. Dionne (Ed.), Sacred places, civic purposes: The role of faith-based organizations in public education (pp. 161-175). Washington, D.C.: The Brookings Institution.
  • Sanders, M. G. (2001). The role of “community” in comprehensive school, family, and community partnership programs. The Elementary School Journal, 102(1), 19-34.
  • Sanders, M. G., & Campbell, T. (2007). Securing the ties that bind: Community involvement and the educational success of African-American students. In J. Jackson (Ed.), Strengthening the educational pipeline for African Americans: Informing policy and practice, (pp. 141-164). Buffalo, NY: SUNY Press.
  • Sanders, M. G., & Galindo, C. (2014). Communities, schools, and teachers. In K. Bauserman, L. Martin, S. Kragler, & D. Quatroche (Eds.), The handbook of professional development, PK-12: successful models and practices. New York: Guilford Publishing.
  • Sanders, M. G., & Hembrick-Roberts, J. (2013).   Leadership for more equitable schools through service integration.  In L. Tillman & J. Scheurich (Eds.), Handbook of research on educational leadership for equity and diversity (pp. 476-493). London: Routledge/Taylor and Francis.
  • Sanders, M. G., Jones, G. A., & Abel, Y. (2002). Involving families and communities in the education of children and youth placed at risk. In S. Stringfield & D. Land (Eds.), Educating at risk students (pp. 171-188). Chicago: National Society for the Study of Education Yearbook.
  • Sanders, M. G., Martinez, G., & White, M. (2012). Reaching out: Partnering with the families and communities of African American urban youth. In J. Moore III & L. Chance (Eds.), Urban school contexts for African American students: Crisis and prospects for Improvement (pp. 245-269). New York: Peter Lang.
  • Sanders, M. G., Watkins-Lewis, K., & Cochrane, K. (in press). The role of out-of-school time programs in bridging the diversity gap and improving educational opportunities for African American students. In H. Malone and T. Donohue (Eds.), The Growing Out-of-School Time Field: Past, Present, and Future. Charlotte, North Carolina: Information Age Publishing.
  • Sheldon, S. B. (2012). Out-of-school learning and family involvement.  In J. Banks (Ed.), Encyclopedia of diversity in education.  Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

College Courses

  • Epstein, J. L. (2013). Ready of not?  Preparing future educators for school, family, and community partnerships.  Teaching Education, 24, 115-118.
  • Epstein, J. L. (2011). School, family, and community partnerships: Preparing educators and improving schools. Second Edition.  Boulder, CO: Westview Press.
    Available from www.perseusbooksgroup.com or www.amazon.com
  • Epstein, J. L. (2005). Links in a professional development chain: Preservice and inservice education for effective programs of school, family, and community partnerships. The New Educator, 1(2), 125-141.
  • Epstein, J. L., & Sanders, M. G. (2006). Prospects for change: Preparing educators for school, family, and community partnerships. Peabody Journal of Education, 81, 81-120.
  • Sanders, M. G. (2009). Teachers and parents. In L. Saha & A. Dworkin (Eds.), The new international handbook of teachers and teaching (pp. 331-343). New York: Springer.

 

Results for Students of Family and Community Involvement

Results for Elementary Students 

  • Epstein, J. L. (2005). A case study of the partnership schools comprehensive school reform (CSR) model. Elementary School Journal, 106(2), 151-170.
  • Epstein, J. L. (2004). Foreword. In P. A. Edwards, Children’s literacy development: Making it happen through school, family, and community involvement (pp. ix-xiv). Boston: Pearson Education.
  • Epstein, J. L., & Sheldon, S. B. (2002). Present and accounted for: Improving student attendance through family and community involvement. Journal of Educational Research, 95, 308-318.
  • Galindo, C. L., & Sheldon, S. B.  (2012). Examining the effects of school and home connections on children’s kindergarten cognitive growth.  Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 27, 90-103.
  • Sheldon, S. B. (2007). Improving student attendance with a school-wide approach to school, family, and community partnerships. Journal of Educational Research, 100, 267-275.
  • Sheldon, S. B. (2003). Linking school-family-community partnerships in urban elementary schools to student achievement on state tests. Urban Review, 35(2), 149-165.
  • Sheldon, S. B., & Epstein, J. L. (2004). Getting students to school: Using family and community involvement to reduce chronic absenteeism. School Community Journal, 4(2), 39-56.
  • Sheldon, S. B., Epstein, J. L., Galindo, C. L.  (2010).  Not just numbers: Creating a partnership climate to improve math proficiency in schools. Leadership and Policy in Schools, 9, 27-48.
  • Sheldon, S. B., & Jung, S. B. (2015). The family engagement project: Student outcome evaluation.  Baltimore, MD.  Center on School, Family, and Community Partnerships at Johns Hopkins University.
  • Van Voorhis, F. L. (2011). Adding families to the homework equation: A longitudinal study of mathematics achievement. Education and Urban Society, 43, 313‐338.
  • Van Voorhis, F. L. (2009). Does family involvement in homework make a difference? Investigating the longitudinal effects of math and language arts interventions. In R. Deslandes (Ed.), International perspectives on student outcomes and homework: Familyschoolcommunity partnerships (pp. 141‐ 156). New York: Routledge.
  • Van Voorhis, F. L., Maier, M. F., Epstein, J. L., & Lloyd, C. L. (2013). Impact of family involvement on the education of children ages 3-8: A focus on literacy and math achievement outcomes and social-emotional skills. New York: MDRC.

Results for Middle and High School Students

  • Epstein, J. L., Simon, B. S., & Salinas, K. C. (1997). Involving parents in homework in the middle grades. Phi Delta Kappa Research Bulletin, 18.
  • Epstein, J. L., & Van Voorhis, F. L. (2001). More than minutes: Teachers’ roles in designing homework. Educational Psychologist, 36(3), 181-193.
  • Hutchins, D. J. (2012). Prepare students for life after high school: Use a partnership approach. VOCAL Journal, 82-85.
  • Mac Iver, M., Epstein, J. L., Sheldon, S. B., & Fonseca, E. (2015).  Engaging families to support students’ transition to high school.  The High School Journal, 99 (1), 27-45.
  • Simon, B. S. (2004). High school outreach and family involvement. Social Psychology of Education, 7, 185-209.
  • Simon, B. S. (2001). Family involvement in high school: Predictors and effects. NASSP Bulletin, 85(627), 8-19.
  • Simon, B. S. (2001). Predictors of high school and family partnerships and the influence of partnerships on student success (Doctoral dissertation, Johns Hopkins University, 2000). Dissertation Abstracts International, 61, 3949.
  • Van Voorhis, F. L. (2003). Interactive homework in middle school: Effects on family involvement and students’ science achievement. Journal of Educational Research, 96(9), 323-339.
  • Van Voorhis, F. L. (2001). Interactive science homework: An experiment in home and school connections. NASSP Bulletin, 85(627), 20-32.
  • Van Voorhis, F. L. (2001). The effects of interactive (TIPS) homework on family involvement and science achievement of middle grade students (Doctoral dissertation, University of Florida, 2000). Dissertation Abstracts International, 61, 4723.

Results for Students Across Grade and School Levels

  • Epstein, J. L.  (2012). Logic model for research on school, family, and community partnerships; Influence paths, interim outcomes, ultimate outcomes.  In Knowlton, L. W. & Phillips, C. C.   The logic model guidebook: Better strategies for great results, second edition.  Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  • Epstein, J. L., & Sheldon, S. B. (2016).  Necessary but not sufficient: The role of policy for advancing programs of school, family, and community partnerships.  Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences, 2(5), 202–219.
  • Epstein, J. L., & Van Voorhis, F. L. (2012).  The changing debate: From assigning homework to designing homework. In E. Reese and S. Suggate (Eds.),Contemporary debates in childhood education (pp. 263-273).  London: Routledge.
  • Hutchins, D. J. (2012). Connecting family and community partners with math and science students. Connect, 25(4), 22-26.
  • Michael, S., Dittus, P., & Epstein, J. L. (2007). Family and community involvement in schools: Results from the School Health Policies and Programs Study 2006. Journal of School Health, 77(8), 567-587.
  • Núñez, J. C., Suárez, N., Rosário, P., Vallejo, G., & Epstein, J. L. (2015).  Relationships between parental involvement in homework, student homework behaviors, and academic achievement: Differences among elementary, junior high, and high school students.  Metacognition & Learning, 10 (3), 375-406. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11409-015-9135-5.
  • Regueiro, B., Suárez, N., Núñez, J. C., Valle, A., & Epstein, J. L. (2017).  Homework and academic achievement: Student, teacher and parent involvement.  Chapter 8 in Factors affecting academic performance, Julio A. Gonzalez-Pienda, et al. (Eds.). Hauppauge, New York: Nova Science Publishers.
  • Sheldon, S. B. (2009).  Improving student outcomes with school, family, and community partnerships.  In J. Epstein, et al. School, family, and community partnerships: Your handbook for action (3rd edition).  Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
  • Sheldon, S. B. (2009).  Using evaluation to prove and improve the quality of partnership programmes in schools.  In R. Deslandes (Ed.), International perspectives on contexts, communities and evaluated innovative practices: Family-school-community partnerships. (pp.126 -142). London: Routledge Press.
  • Sheldon, S. B. (2007). Improving student attendance with a school-wide approach to school-family-community partnerships. Journal of Educational Research, 100, 267 – 275.
  • Sheldon, S. B., & Epstein, J. L. (2002). Improving student behavior and discipline with family and community involvement. Education in Urban Society, 35(1), 4-26.
  • Sheldon, S. B., & Epstein, J. L. (2005). Involvement counts: Family and community partnerships and math achievement. Journal of Educational Research, 98(4), 196-206.
  • Sheldon, S. B., & Epstein, J. L. (2005). School programs of family and community involvement to support children’s reading and literacy development. In J. Flood and P. Anders (Eds.), Literacy development of students in urban schools: Research and policy (pp. 107-138). Newark, DE: International Reading Association (IRA).
  • Suárez, N., Regueiro, B., Epstein, J. L., Pineiro, I., et al.  (2016). Homework involvement and academic achievement of native and immigrant students.  Frontiers in Psychology: Section on Educational Psychology.  http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01517.
  • Van Voorhis, F. L. (2011a). Costs and benefits of family involvement in homework: Lessons learned from students and families. Journal of Advanced Academics, 22, 220‐249.
  • Van Voorhis, F. L. (2011b). Engaging families in student homework: Action steps for educators. In H. Kreider & H. Westmoreland, (Eds.). Family engagement in outofschool time (pp. 83‐96). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
  • Van Voorhis, F. L. (2011c). Maximum homework impact: Optimizing time, purposes, communication, and collaboration. In S. Redding, M. Murphy, & P. Sheley (Eds.). Handbook on family and community engagement (pp. 109‐112). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
  • Van Voorhis, F. L. (2009). The inside scoop on homework: Making you busy or making you better. T&T News.